Leadership

Gratitude.


This is traditionally the time one would write a post that details all the things he’s grateful for.  This is not that post. The concept of gratitude deserves more than that.

In recent months I’ve gotten the opportunity to build formal coaching relationships with managers at several client companies in our space. Among many other topics, we often discuss the adoption and application of core team values: those qualities that become the basis for your strategies and decisions, and with which your team most strongly identifies – now and when they look back on their work with you. We discuss core values like resiliency, adaptability, action, curiosity and pride. Ideas like joy, empathy, respect and passion also find their way into the discussions. All are hugely powerful and useful in crafting culture and shaping behavior. But perhaps the most powerful value is one that’s often overlooked.

Yes, gratitude.

This week’s Drift is proudly underwritten by Bionic for Ad Sales, a free app that helps you reach media planners at exactly the right time and place – in their media planning system when they start a new media plan (with a fresh budget!). To learn more, go to https://www.bionic-ads.com/seller/

In far too many organizations, being grateful is something we need to remember to do… it’s the seasoning we add at the end of a project, a sale, a quarter. Gratitude is something we summon and put on display on special occasions. But imagine the powerful change that occurs when gratitude is embraced as a core value…when it becomes part of who you are as a team and as individuals.

In life and business, gratitude is the fuel that makes us work harder and be more committed than we otherwise might. It’s the nourishment that helps us rise to the occasion and overcome cynicism in the face of big, hairy, audacious goals. If one of your first active thoughts in a day is about being grateful, it’s almost impossible to have a bad day.

Imagine your team living up to the following statement: We will live, work and act gratefully in all we do. Just having this as a vision would change how you address customer service, interdepartmental work and collaboration and the sales process itself. If you started with, I’m really grateful to have this account, your work, approach and commitment would all shift dramatically.

Gratitude is the most human of superpowers. We can all decide to embrace it on a deeply personal level, and you can choose to make it core to your team’s values first thing tomorrow.

Being grateful is not something to remember. It’s something to live up to.


Summer is for Managers. (Part III)


In this third of our summertime management posts, we take a second look at leadership and how it defines the organizations we all struggle to manage.

I’ve been thinking a lot about leadership within and across the dozens of companies I’ve worked with over the past several years.  A single disruptive idea keeps coming back to me:

Leadership isn’t a set of actions by the leader.  It’s a state of being for the organization.

In this age of strong-man leaders and celebrity CEOs, we tend to individualize leadership and celebrate the speeches and the big “leadership moves” of the individual leader.  But from all I can tell, those victories are pyrrhic and their effects ephemeral.  The truly great leaders know that leadership isn’t about what you do or fix; it’s about what you tend and sustain.  It’s not the next hill to be taken, but the ecosystem to be developed and supported.

Promotional Message: As a CRO, you’d love all your managers to have two more years of experience and perspective, but you can’t afford to wait that long.  In one to two days, Upstream Group can offer the equivalent of an executive MBA in digital sales management custom built to their needs.  Executive Sales Strategist Scot McLernon has led two different sales organizations that were both recognized as the industry’s best by the IAB, and he’s ready to help your managers better compete for the people and business your company deserves. Ask us about “Accelerated Transformation for Sales Managers” today. 

In my opinion, great organizational leaders (whether they are leading an entire company or a sales organization) should be focused on the questions behind three overlapping and interdependent ecosystems:  Talent, Incubation and Culture.

How might we attract, filter and secure the talent we need and deserve?

How might we better incubate and assimilate that talent into our organization during the critical first two years after hiring?

How might we foster and maintain an attractive, supportive culture based on employee engagement?

Great leaders keep asking their managers these questions and weigh each big decision or program against the scrutiny these questions create.  And they force their managers and teams to examine the overlap and co-dependence of these concerns.  Without an attractive culture, how can a company attract great talent?  Without a focus on incubating new talent, what is the point of securing those hires in the first place?  Unless we engage our employees, new and experienced, in caring for and teaching each other, how would we ever hope to create an attractive culture?

Great leadership isn’t about you.  It’s about your organizational focus and values. But you need to start that conversation.


Your Double Life.


Individual contributors become managers every day, and when they do the event is usually quite clear and visible to everyone in the organization. But the transition from manager to leader can be another story entirely.

I just read a terrific post by Butterfly co-founder Simon Rakosi called “Why Transforming Managers into Leaders Shouldn’t be Left to Chance.” He points out some great distinctions between management and leadership, including Managers educate around skills and tasks; leaders inspire around a vision and Managers view their employees in silos; leaders focus on team dynamics.

The challenge in our dynamic, hyper-kinetic industry is that there’s rarely a clean breaking point between one job and the next: it’s rare that someone ever says “I’m done being a manager now: time to start leading!” Most senior digital sales executives will pivot between these two roles a thousand times – often within the same day.

This week’s Drift is proudly underwritten by Krux, the Salesforce DMP.  Krux drives more valuable content, commerce, and advertising experiences for the world’s leading marketers and media companies. Clients include Anheuser-Busch In-Bev, JetBlue, Kellogg, L’Oréal, Meredith Corporation, NewsCorp, the BBC, and Peugeot Citroen. Learn more at www.krux.com.

On paper, the chief revenue officer is a leadership job, while the regional director is pretty clearly a manager. But the CRO must instantly snap back into manager mode when working with her direct reports, while the regional director must step up and lead when in the presence of his full team. A couple of thoughts and ideas to make your head stop spinning:

  • Leaders play checkers, managers play chess. So says Marcus Buckingham in “The One Thing You Need to Know.” When you’re in leader mode, all the pieces move the same, so the message or policy is for everyone.  When managing, each piece moves differently:  focus on what’s right for the individual in front of you right now.
  • Lead in public, manage in private. Managing is an individual sport. Shut the door.
  • Every group deserves a culture. If you’re manager of a team of individual contributors and others – even if that group is just two or three people – start answering the question “What does it mean to be part of our team?” Better yet, answer it together.
  • You can never understand enough about how people work together. Process, process, process. Leaders rightly obsess about it, and their teams get more out of it than you might imagine. Beware of any discussion that ends with “We’ll figure that out…”

To all of you out there who are living double lives, make sure you live in the moment and be the best manager and leader you can be. Just be sure you know which is appropriate and called for at the time.


State of Leadership.


State of LeadershipAs we continue our preparation for the Fall Seller Forum on September 14th, (“Beyond the Org Chart: The Maturing of Digital Sales Leadership”) I’ve been thinking a lot about leadership within and across the dozens of companies I’ve worked with over the past several years.  A single disruptive idea keeps coming back to me:

Leadership isn’t a set of actions by the leader.  It’s a state of being for the organization.

In this age of strong-man leaders and celebrity CEOs, we tend to individualize leadership and celebrate the speeches and the big “leadership moves” of the individual leader.  But from all I can tell, those victories are pyrrhic and their effects ephemeral.  The truly great leaders know that leadership isn’t about what you do or fix; it’s about what you tend and sustain.  It’s not the next hill to be taken, but the ecosystem to be developed and supported.

This week’s Drift is proudly underwritten by AppNexus. The AppNexus Publisher Suite helps maximize monetization for Publishers today with tomorrow’s technology through integrated, intelligent, and open ad serving and programmatic selling solutions.

In my opinion, great organizational leaders (whether they are leading an entire company or a sales organization) should be focused on the questions behind three overlapping and interdependent ecosystems:  Talent, Incubation and Culture.

How might we attract, filter and secure the talent we need and deserve?

How might we better incubate and assimilate that talent into our organization during the critical first two years after hiring?

How might we foster and maintain an attractive, supportive culture based on employee engagement?

Great leaders keep asking their managers these questions and weigh each big decision or program against the scrutiny these questions create.  And they force their managers and teams to examine the overlap and codependence of these concerns.  Without an attractive culture, how can a company attract great talent?  Without a focus on incubating new talent, what is the point of securing those hires in the first place?  Unless we engage our employees, new and experienced, in caring for and teaching each other, how would we ever hope to create an attractive culture?

I look forward to fleshing these concepts out further at the Seller Forum and in discussions with customers in the coming months and years.  If you’d like to be part of the immediate discussion – and if you lead a media sales organization – reach out to secure your seat for the Fall Forum.

Great leadership isn’t about you.  It’s about your organizational focus and values. But you need to start that conversation.


On Leadership.


On LeadershipAmong the dozen books I consistently recommend, there’s one that I consider a must-read for anyone tasked with leading a company, a sales force or any kind of team. I’m talking about Marcus Buckingham’s “The One Thing You Need to Know.” I’m thinking a lot about leadership just now, as it’s the central topic for the fall Seller Forum. And as inspiration, Buckingham doesn’t disappoint.

The trick about “The One Thing” is that it’s actually three things. After playing a little intellectual cat-and-mouse, the author tells you “The One Thing” about “Great Managing, Great Leading and Sustained Individual Success.” I’ll focus here on what he tells us about leadership and what it can mean to you.

This week’s Drift is proudly underwritten by The Media Trust. The Media Trust provides critical insight into the digital advertising ecosystem through continuous monitoring of websites and ad tags to verify ad campaign rendering, ensure creative quality, and protect against malware, data leakage and site performance issues, which lead to lost revenue, privacy violations and brand damage. Visit www.TheMediaTrust.com

On my first reading, the revelation was that leading and managing were two completely different functions. “Managers play chess” (in which every piece – every individual in your company – has different qualities) and “leaders play checkers” (in which every piece moves the same) is another way of saying “management is individual and leadership is universal.” When you are leading, you are speaking to and for the entire organization – you are saying what’s true for all of us, not just some of us.

Which leads me to “The One Thing” about effective leaders: they are clear.

Clarity, according to Buckingham, is the single quality that all effective leaders share. He tells us that it’s more important for a leader to be clear than it is for him or her to be right: if you’re clear enough about what you believe, those who follow you will help “make you right” in the end. The leader is the one who clearly communicates what the company or group believes, its values and its destination.   But is there “One Thing” that it’s most important to be clear about? Yes. A leader clearly answers the question “Who do we serve?” Take a minute with this one: it only seems clear on the surface, and you may be surprised by how much ambiguity there is on this question in your own organization.

If you have a favorite book, quotation or TED Talk on leadership, I’d love for you to share it.

And if you are a digital media sales leader and would like to attend the Fall Seller Forum on Wednesday October 21st in New York, let us know right away. The event may be two months away, but more than a third of the available seats are already gone.