It’s in the Doing.


The most disempowering lies we tell ourselves every day start with when and if only.

When I get fully up to speed on everything this customer is doing, then I’ll be in a position to really kill it… If only I had a few more years seniority, I’ll bet they’d take my calls… When I get caught up and get past this crazy quarter, I’ll get my shit together… If only I studied harder and learned more, I’d have the confidence to really own that room.

While they sound a little different from one another, the commonality of these lies is how they make your actions – and your ultimate success – conditional on some kind of achievement or emotional change. It’s a transactional way to look at growth: only when I’ve paid enough or done enough to achieve some level of psychic investment can I take the actions that will make my situation better.

But this is crazy. In fact, it’s ass-backward.

Is your sales team describing instead of selling? You win business one serious, well-planned meeting at a time. Can your team do that? A strategic digital sales workshop with Doug Weaver and Upstream Group is easier and more cost-effective than you’d imagine. Reach out now. The consult is free.

You don’t develop a perfect outlook on fitness that leads you to the gym. You drag your butt out of bed and get on the elliptical and feel better for doing it. The belief and the feelings of confidence and well-being don’t precede the action… they are brought on by the action.

Sales reps don’t do better work because they are more confident. They are more confident because they do better work.

They don’t get in touch with their passion for a company or a project sitting on a mountaintop. Passion is the result of effort. Not its cause.

If you’re a manager, stop trying to manage what’s in the heads of your team members. It doesn’t matter and, in any case, you can’t know it or change it.  Base your conversations not on what your employees are thinking or feeling… focus instead on what they’re doing. My approach to training is centered on specific, discrete actions that sellers must take – building a client POV; identifying and writing out a problem you plan to solve for the client. It’s the doing of this work that makes the seller more valuable to his or her clients, more confident, and more versatile.

One of my long-ago bosses taught me a great lesson. After listening to our team telling one another all of our when and if only lies, he’d stand up and say, Well, it doesn’t sound like anything a good sales call won’t fix. And he was right.

As Spencer Tracy once said, It’s impossible to feel sad and useful at the same time. If you’re a seller, default to action. You will work yourself into the confidence, the passion and the state of mind you’ve so long wished for.


Don’t Speak!


Quiet down now. Don’t speak, just for a little bit. Let the moment marinate.

Most of us in sales are running over-programmed sales calls in which every pause, every quiet second, is something to be filled and patched over like so many cracks in a leaky boat. We believe that there is just so much to say and explain that to waste even a second means perhaps missing the one point or feature that might create the magic moment. But it’s a fool’s errand: the magic moments were there all along… we just talked over them.

Those empty seconds of silence are actually filled with anticipation, consideration, curiosity. They are the wellsprings of customer collaboration and commitment to the idea. But as the seller you have to do more than just listen.  You have to program these white space moments into your sales calls.

STAQ is proudly underwriting this week’s Drift. STAQ’s Industry Benchmarking provides actionable insights into your programmatic performance compared to the broader marketplace. This week’s insight: Most desktop display impression volume is 50%-70% viewable, yet there’s no meaningful CPM increase for viewability increases between 40% and 70%. For deeper insights including mobile viewability and CPMs, Join STAQ Industry Benchmarking.

In the sales workshops I conduct for media and technology sellers, the problems to be solved are always remarkably similar: the seller has far too much information and detail to share; the buyer is far too jaded, distracted and evasive; the marketplace is confusing and filled with far too many competitors; the time together is brief and fleeting.

Too many managers – and sales trainers – give the shallow admonition to “do your homework” and “listen more than you talk.”  But that means little to the seller. What she really needs is a plan… a plan to provoke and manage those quiet moments of consideration and commitment. That’s what I try to provide, and there are just five parts to the plan.

  1. First, show the customer a slide that tells them a few things you’ve learned about their business, their situation, their needs, their competitors. Ask them what they think is most important on this slide and what else you might have missed. Then shut up and listen fully.
  2. Next, show them a slide or page that clearly (and briefly) outlines the problem you hope to solve for them. Ask them how much this issue means to them and what else is critical to talk about. Then shut up and listen fully.
  3. Before talking about your solution, show them a page that makes a handful of promises about the standards and practices your company will employ in solving the problem for them. Ask if these are important considerations and what else they value. Then shut up and listen fully.
  4. Now talk about your potential solutions. Stop the conversation at several points and invite some silence by asking “How do you feel about this? … What would you do here?” At each point, shut up and listen fully.
  5. Finally, ask the customer for a commitment: If we can deliver this will you approve $X budget for it? This may be the most important silence of all. Shut up and let your customer fill the void.

This is what programming the silence looks like. At each step in the process you are provoking a thoughtful response from the customer. The opposite of talking isn’t just listening. It’s being in the moment. And it works.

I first posted this idea in 2016. Is it still just as relevant to you and your team? A customized, collaborative sales strategy workshop is easier and more cost-effective than you might think. Visit upstreamgroup.com/workshops or reach out directly to learn more.


Buh-Bye!


You’re used to the loud ones. The sellers and others in your org who complain – about systems, sales goals, products – are the least of your worries as a manager. Because they are up in your grill about every little thing, you’ll have plenty of chances to engage: they won’t surprise you. Likewise, the seller who’s working hard but missing goals and suffering financially – you’ll step in and connect seeing her financial plight.

No, the ones who should keep you up at night are the ones who don’t keep you up at night. The quiet performers, the stalwarts. He’s the efficient performer who always seems to be quota-adjacent and doesn’t make much noise. He might be in a far-flung regional or home-office, or he might be right under your nose at headquarters.

And out of the blue, he’s just told you he’s leaving you.

STAQ’s Industry Benchmarks provides actionable insights into your programmatic performance compared to the broader marketplace. This week’s market level insight: Mobile increases 9.75% as a percent of total revenue by device YOY while desktop decreases 10.87%. This trend is expected to continue through 2019. Join STAQ’s Industry Benchmarks today.

What to do now? Nothing. It’s too late, and countering the offer he’s gotten is bad strategy. But reflecting on the situation so it doesn’t happen again (and again!) is a very good idea. So here goes.

People join companies, but they quit managers. And not always because the manager was awful. Often its because the manager never fostered a culture that the employee could belong to. Even as she performed well, she continued to be a well-liked outsider. What was lacking was engagement.

Understand and manage engagement. Gallup has done years of research on employee engagement, and it’s not what you think. The majority of employees are actually not engaged with their companies or their teams – including the quiet performer who’s just handed you his laptop and company ID. Engaged employees talk about their team using the word we, and talk about their work at the company in future tense. Engagement is not something you hire; it’s something you – the manager – creates.

Back to college. That sales meeting or team training you considered only seems like a luxury. In terms of employee retention, it’s a bargain. Managers who regularly bring their teams together in learning and sharing environments enjoy better retention. The team gathering is when there becomes an us. But don’t use these occasions to just talk at your people and drown them in facts.

Give them a voice. Engaging managers don’t dispense facts; they manage with questions. “How should we approach this?” and “What do you think we should do?” forces your team members to think, share and engage.

Give them something to own. You foster engagement by surrendering control. Letting team members lead initiatives, develop category and technical specialties, run programs and teach others isn’t just about feel-good inclusiveness. It’s what binds your best people.

If your quiet performer was engaged, she wouldn’t have been open to the job she’s leaving you for. Sometimes the best hiring strategy is not needing to hire at all.

A customized, collaborative sales strategy workshop for your team is easier and more cost-effective than you might think. And it may be the key to not only performance, but retention of your best people. Visit www.upstreamgroup.com/workshops or reach out directly to learn more.


Team You.


Last week I posted some ideas about how to shake off the torpor and malaise of Q1-2019 in the digital ad/marketing business. Today I’m speaking to managers and sales leaders.  This is a moment where you can (and should!) reshape your relationship with your team. What looks like a rough patch is actually a garden of possibility.

Whether you’re a CRO, a regional manager, a vertical category lead or even a project captain, there are some immediate, tangible and highly effective moves to be made.

STAQ is generously underwriting this week’s Drift. STAQ’s Industry Benchmarks provides actionable insights into your programmatic performance compared to the broader marketplace. This week’s market level insight: Open auction hits 90% of total programmatic revenue in January and February of 2019, a level not crossed in any month in 2018. Join STAQ’s Industry Benchmarks today.

No Group is Too Small for a Culture. Those who wait for the company to define and establish a culture and values for their teams are inevitably frustrated. Think of the sales team you lead (and don’t forget the account managers and others who support!) as if it were a platoon. Unit cohesion is everything, and Team You is looking to you – their leader – for inspiration and guidance. Engage them (in a group and individually) with these questions: As a team, what do we believe? And How do we treat one another? It won’t all happen at once, but it will begin to happen immediately.

Manage the Moments. If you think management is about the reviews you conduct and the meetings you lead, think again. What you do – occasionally – in the big moments pales in importance beside what you do in all the little ones. Are you pausing and getting your team members to bring answers along with the problems? Are you leading conversations with optimism and patience? Are you summoning the discipline to be completely clear with your employees? Like parenting, management is not something you can schedule.

Reinvent the Meeting. When you do bring your team together, put some real thought and planning into it. Do in a team meeting what you can only do in a team meeting. Don’t waste time reviewing numbers and facts. Decide. Question. Plan. Prioritize. Collaborate. If there’s no strong verb associated with your meeting, it’s not serving your needs or your culture.

Don’t Scrimp on the Inspiration. Statistically, most of us don’t sit in the pews on Sunday anymore, but we are joining the Church of TED in record numbers. There has never been more thoughtful motivation available than there is right now, all with a mouse click. Real people are overcoming real adversity and re-framing business and leadership practices, and they’re giving it to us for free. Program a 5-minute video or short article into your team meetings, along with some discussion time. You may get an eye-roll or a cynical comment along the way, but stay with it. For strugglers, it’s hope; for performers, it’s fuel.

Team You won’t just happen. It takes work and discipline. But it’s your most impactful – and controllable – driver of success.

A customized sales strategy workshop for your team is easier and more cost-effective than you might think. And it may be the key to not only performance, but retention of your best people. Visit www.upstreamgroup.com/workshops or reach out directly to learn more.


Shake it Off!


Snap out of it! 

Yeah… you know who I’m talking to: You there in the Slanket about to launch your Netflix queue. Like many others in the digital ad business, Q1 2019 has been a hazy sleepwalk of stalled budgets, consolidation, sheepish buying and general malaise. But it’s not just you. And it’s not fatal. And it ends now.

Today’s Drift is our collective wake-up call. Here are a few ideas and themes to get your motor going and shake off the cold of Internet Marketing Winter.

STAQ is proudly underwriting this week’s Drift.  STAQ’s Industry Benchmarks provide insights into programmatic performance compared to the broader marketplace. This week’s insight: The 300×250 dominates as mobile continues to grow. The ad unit’s share of mobile revenue increased to 59% in 2019, while its share of revenue on desktop dropped to 19%.  Join STAQ Industry Benchmarks.

Start with One Short List. Getting your business back on track seems overwhelming because of the hundred choices and tasks littering your desktop and inbox. Get all that shit out of your way by consolidating into one short list. If it’s not something that’s going to get you closer to a customer or drive a revenue opportunity forward, table it.

Default to Action. Make sure your short list includes a lot of action verbs like write and call and propose. These will be your triggers to act.  Don’t fall prey to wimpy non-actions like follow up and touch base. The feeling of getting important things done has a massive psychological impact. You move the ball and simultaneously blow your funk out of the water.

Turn Down the In-House Noise. Has anybody ever bought anything from you on Slack? I didn’t think so. Yet we allow ourselves to let an endless string of email chains, slack discussions and internal meetings eat our days. Just say no. Put an internal out of office message on that says I’m on client business right now: text or phone me with any specific, urgent items. Then go back to your list.

Aim for the Middle. The CMO isn’t going to see you and the media planners can’t help you. But there’s a whole lot of people in the middle who can. Client advertising managers and marketing staff; agency media directors and group VPs.  Reach out to them with some We were thinking about your business today notes that cite a potential business problem, missing audience segment, storytelling problem… whatever. Ask for a short phone meeting with screen sharing (it’s less threatening and easier to schedule.)

Generosity is Fuel. Right now, you might be hung up on your need to sell something. Anything! This is exactly the time to be generous. Internally, do a favor or pay someone a public compliment. With your customers, think about doing something cool for their businesses. Generosity gets you out of your own head and breaks the negative loop you’re stuck in. Don’t just make a deal, make a difference.

Ask Unreasonable Questions. Are you open to having us earn a million dollars by solving a problem for your client? What would it take for you to open up the budgeting process and consider improving your plan? What would get us immediate approval to go to contract on this? 

Expect Nothing. Blame No One. Do Something. You are the one you’ve been waiting for. There are a million mopes out there who will only ever be a little better than the worst break they’ve had. Overcoming adversity and being better than your circumstances starts with a positive choice. Make that choice now and start acting on it.

Could your sales team use a boost? We build and deliver custom sales strategy and process workshops with a deep understanding of digital advertising, motivations and the fundamentals of selling. Visit www.upstreamgroup.com/workshops or reach out directly to learn more.