Online Sales

One More Question…


You’ve been with the customer for close to 40 minutes. From your perspective, the meeting has gone well. You got through all your recommended products and background and the customer seemed engaged throughout… she even asked some really great questions. All seems positive and optimistic.

And then you say… So, what do you think our next steps are ?

And then she says… Give us some time to get our direction and budgets aligned. Maybe in the meantime you can write some of this up and send it to me?

And just like that… it all goes away. Once again, you’ve ended up in the friend zone. You’ve had a polite, inoffensive, inconclusive call that will not lead to any kind of business commitment. It didn’t have to be this way.

Is your sales team describing instead of selling? You win business one serious, well-planned meeting at a time. Can your team do that? A strategic digital sales workshop with Doug Weaver and Upstream Group is easier and more cost-effective than you’d imagine. Reach out now. The consult is free.

What if instead, you’d asked… So, Jen, based on our discussion, will you recommend this program to the client for $800K and a Q1 activation?

She might still have said something like… Well, I don’t know yet. We’re still waiting to see what the budget will look like.

And then you could have said… Can you tell me more about the budgeting process? How are you feeling about it this year? Does the client seem like he’ll be thinking expansively?

Or… If the budgets come in at a reasonable level, can you tell me how the decision to move on this would happen?  Who’d be involved in making that call?

Or… I know there’s more work to be done. How do you feel personally about the idea? Is it something that you think makes sense for the client?

The initial closing question – the one about $800K in Q1 – may sound abrupt to the ears of the average seller. This may be because of Impostor Syndrome — not feeling like you deserve to ask it. Or because your meeting was just a recitation of your company and your products and there was really nothing to ask for.

But it may also be because you misunderstand the real purpose of closing. We don’t ask a firm closing question because we expect the customer to say yes. We ask it because we want to get to all the other questions… the ones that qualify the opportunity… that help us understand the decision process… that identify other decision makers… and that give insights into the opinions and motivations of the person across the desk.

There’s always one more question to ask. The quality and value of your sales calls depends on how they end. That’s why they call it closing.


It’s in the Doing.


The most disempowering lies we tell ourselves every day start with when and if only.

When I get fully up to speed on everything this customer is doing, then I’ll be in a position to really kill it… If only I had a few more years seniority, I’ll bet they’d take my calls… When I get caught up and get past this crazy quarter, I’ll get my shit together… If only I studied harder and learned more, I’d have the confidence to really own that room.

While they sound a little different from one another, the commonality of these lies is how they make your actions – and your ultimate success – conditional on some kind of achievement or emotional change. It’s a transactional way to look at growth: only when I’ve paid enough or done enough to achieve some level of psychic investment can I take the actions that will make my situation better.

But this is crazy. In fact, it’s ass-backward.

Is your sales team describing instead of selling? You win business one serious, well-planned meeting at a time. Can your team do that? A strategic digital sales workshop with Doug Weaver and Upstream Group is easier and more cost-effective than you’d imagine. Reach out now. The consult is free.

You don’t develop a perfect outlook on fitness that leads you to the gym. You drag your butt out of bed and get on the elliptical and feel better for doing it. The belief and the feelings of confidence and well-being don’t precede the action… they are brought on by the action.

Sales reps don’t do better work because they are more confident. They are more confident because they do better work.

They don’t get in touch with their passion for a company or a project sitting on a mountaintop. Passion is the result of effort. Not its cause.

If you’re a manager, stop trying to manage what’s in the heads of your team members. It doesn’t matter and, in any case, you can’t know it or change it.  Base your conversations not on what your employees are thinking or feeling… focus instead on what they’re doing. My approach to training is centered on specific, discrete actions that sellers must take – building a client POV; identifying and writing out a problem you plan to solve for the client. It’s the doing of this work that makes the seller more valuable to his or her clients, more confident, and more versatile.

One of my long-ago bosses taught me a great lesson. After listening to our team telling one another all of our when and if only lies, he’d stand up and say, Well, it doesn’t sound like anything a good sales call won’t fix. And he was right.

As Spencer Tracy once said, It’s impossible to feel sad and useful at the same time. If you’re a seller, default to action. You will work yourself into the confidence, the passion and the state of mind you’ve so long wished for.


Don’t Speak!


Quiet down now. Don’t speak, just for a little bit. Let the moment marinate.

Most of us in sales are running over-programmed sales calls in which every pause, every quiet second, is something to be filled and patched over like so many cracks in a leaky boat. We believe that there is just so much to say and explain that to waste even a second means perhaps missing the one point or feature that might create the magic moment. But it’s a fool’s errand: the magic moments were there all along… we just talked over them.

Those empty seconds of silence are actually filled with anticipation, consideration, curiosity. They are the wellsprings of customer collaboration and commitment to the idea. But as the seller you have to do more than just listen.  You have to program these white space moments into your sales calls.

STAQ is proudly underwriting this week’s Drift. STAQ’s Industry Benchmarking provides actionable insights into your programmatic performance compared to the broader marketplace. This week’s insight: Most desktop display impression volume is 50%-70% viewable, yet there’s no meaningful CPM increase for viewability increases between 40% and 70%. For deeper insights including mobile viewability and CPMs, Join STAQ Industry Benchmarking.

In the sales workshops I conduct for media and technology sellers, the problems to be solved are always remarkably similar: the seller has far too much information and detail to share; the buyer is far too jaded, distracted and evasive; the marketplace is confusing and filled with far too many competitors; the time together is brief and fleeting.

Too many managers – and sales trainers – give the shallow admonition to “do your homework” and “listen more than you talk.”  But that means little to the seller. What she really needs is a plan… a plan to provoke and manage those quiet moments of consideration and commitment. That’s what I try to provide, and there are just five parts to the plan.

  1. First, show the customer a slide that tells them a few things you’ve learned about their business, their situation, their needs, their competitors. Ask them what they think is most important on this slide and what else you might have missed. Then shut up and listen fully.
  2. Next, show them a slide or page that clearly (and briefly) outlines the problem you hope to solve for them. Ask them how much this issue means to them and what else is critical to talk about. Then shut up and listen fully.
  3. Before talking about your solution, show them a page that makes a handful of promises about the standards and practices your company will employ in solving the problem for them. Ask if these are important considerations and what else they value. Then shut up and listen fully.
  4. Now talk about your potential solutions. Stop the conversation at several points and invite some silence by asking “How do you feel about this? … What would you do here?” At each point, shut up and listen fully.
  5. Finally, ask the customer for a commitment: If we can deliver this will you approve $X budget for it? This may be the most important silence of all. Shut up and let your customer fill the void.

This is what programming the silence looks like. At each step in the process you are provoking a thoughtful response from the customer. The opposite of talking isn’t just listening. It’s being in the moment. And it works.

I first posted this idea in 2016. Is it still just as relevant to you and your team? A customized, collaborative sales strategy workshop is easier and more cost-effective than you might think. Visit upstreamgroup.com/workshops or reach out directly to learn more.


Shake it Off!


Snap out of it! 

Yeah… you know who I’m talking to: You there in the Slanket about to launch your Netflix queue. Like many others in the digital ad business, Q1 2019 has been a hazy sleepwalk of stalled budgets, consolidation, sheepish buying and general malaise. But it’s not just you. And it’s not fatal. And it ends now.

Today’s Drift is our collective wake-up call. Here are a few ideas and themes to get your motor going and shake off the cold of Internet Marketing Winter.

STAQ is proudly underwriting this week’s Drift.  STAQ’s Industry Benchmarks provide insights into programmatic performance compared to the broader marketplace. This week’s insight: The 300×250 dominates as mobile continues to grow. The ad unit’s share of mobile revenue increased to 59% in 2019, while its share of revenue on desktop dropped to 19%.  Join STAQ Industry Benchmarks.

Start with One Short List. Getting your business back on track seems overwhelming because of the hundred choices and tasks littering your desktop and inbox. Get all that shit out of your way by consolidating into one short list. If it’s not something that’s going to get you closer to a customer or drive a revenue opportunity forward, table it.

Default to Action. Make sure your short list includes a lot of action verbs like write and call and propose. These will be your triggers to act.  Don’t fall prey to wimpy non-actions like follow up and touch base. The feeling of getting important things done has a massive psychological impact. You move the ball and simultaneously blow your funk out of the water.

Turn Down the In-House Noise. Has anybody ever bought anything from you on Slack? I didn’t think so. Yet we allow ourselves to let an endless string of email chains, slack discussions and internal meetings eat our days. Just say no. Put an internal out of office message on that says I’m on client business right now: text or phone me with any specific, urgent items. Then go back to your list.

Aim for the Middle. The CMO isn’t going to see you and the media planners can’t help you. But there’s a whole lot of people in the middle who can. Client advertising managers and marketing staff; agency media directors and group VPs.  Reach out to them with some We were thinking about your business today notes that cite a potential business problem, missing audience segment, storytelling problem… whatever. Ask for a short phone meeting with screen sharing (it’s less threatening and easier to schedule.)

Generosity is Fuel. Right now, you might be hung up on your need to sell something. Anything! This is exactly the time to be generous. Internally, do a favor or pay someone a public compliment. With your customers, think about doing something cool for their businesses. Generosity gets you out of your own head and breaks the negative loop you’re stuck in. Don’t just make a deal, make a difference.

Ask Unreasonable Questions. Are you open to having us earn a million dollars by solving a problem for your client? What would it take for you to open up the budgeting process and consider improving your plan? What would get us immediate approval to go to contract on this? 

Expect Nothing. Blame No One. Do Something. You are the one you’ve been waiting for. There are a million mopes out there who will only ever be a little better than the worst break they’ve had. Overcoming adversity and being better than your circumstances starts with a positive choice. Make that choice now and start acting on it.

Could your sales team use a boost? We build and deliver custom sales strategy and process workshops with a deep understanding of digital advertising, motivations and the fundamentals of selling. Visit www.upstreamgroup.com/workshops or reach out directly to learn more.


The New Normal?


Understanding our business by following the recent headlines about digital publishers is like learning civics by binge-watching cable news.  Yes, there are real issues and struggles. But there is also a fair bit of handwaving, amplification and ginned-up drama.

Yes, it’s awful if your job was eliminated in your company’s recent RIF.  Yes, it sucks if the company’s recent pivot and reorg means you’re now doing a job you don’t like quite as much.  And yes, it’s lousy that your firm has gotten a big haircut in its valuation.

But no, this is not the beginning of the end.

STAQ is proudly underwriting this week’s Drift.  STAQ’s Industry Benchmarks provides insights into programmatic performance compared to the broader marketplace.  This week’s insight: video units are being sold at an average of 6x higher CPMs than display ($8.46 vs $1.26), while PMPs for video are 2.5x higher than Open Auction ($16.86 vs $6.93).  Join STAQ’s Industry Benchmarks today.

It will sound simplistic and reductive, but having spent a full quarter of a century in digital media has given me some perspective on our latest crisis of confidence.  And since perspective seems to be in short supply just now, let me share.

Hegemony is Not Forever.  We were once assured that winner in digital advertising was Netscape.  (I’ll pause while you look it up.)  Since then we’ve seen Infoseek, Yahoo, Microsoft, AOL and others come and go.  Consolidation is a fact of life – it has always been thus – but it’s also cyclical.  The biggest guys dominate everything for a while, and then the smaller, more specialized players make a comeback.

Don’t Think You Know.  Don’t compare your insides to everybody else’s outsides.  As we struggle with our own company’s glitches and limitations, we tend to romanticize the workings and success of others.  Having spent time in the backyards of close to 700 companies over the years, I can tell you that everybody has weeds and brown spots.

It’s About the Marketer, Stupid!  Put away your 2×2 competitive matrix and lose your copy of the latest analyst reports.  Obsessively pouring over The Racing Form won’t make your horse run any faster.  If you’re going to obsess, stay tightly focused on marketers and their immediate business problems.  There are audiences they can’t connect with and stories they can’t tell.  They’re confused and anxious and need your help.  Put your energy on them:  it’s their money.

People Matter.  Sure, great technology might win you some deals and make your company more valuable to investors and acquirers.  But the dirty little secret is that smart people paying attention to a quality process still matter.  A lot. Our customers are working with the lowest headcounts and brain-counts they’ve ever experienced.  Care enough and focus on the right things and you’ll earn far more than a spot on the plan… you’ll become an in-sourced department and you’ll be bulletproof.

Default to Action.   Every one of us has a finite amount of attention and energy.  Spend it worrying about your competitors or watching stock prices and industry headlines and see where it gets you.  Expect nothing…blame no one…do something.  You can’t control the outcome but you can control your own behavior and choices.  And feel great about the work you do…every day.