Doug Weaver

It Ain’t Showbiz.


If I asked most Drift readers what they do for a living, they’d offer up a job title like chief revenue officer, account executive or regional director. If pushed for a more concrete job description, eventually most would say they sell advertising, technology or services to marketers and agencies.

But I don’t think that’s what you do at all. At best, selling describes an outcome, a result of other actions you take every day… at least, if you’re doing it well. It’s taken me a long time and a lot of observation and introspection to get there, but I think I’ve nailed what great sellers do: they engineer experiences. The mediocre ones? They’re the ones who get all caught up in the performance they’re giving, the lines they recite, and the slides they flip through.

This week’s Drift is proudly underwritten by Bionic for Ad Sales, which automates ad sales lead generation with software that pitches your ad inventory to hundreds of media planning teams while they are making media buying decisions. To learn more, go to https://www.bionic-ads.com/seller/

A sales call isn’t a golf shot or a piano sonata. But so many of us prepare and act as if it is. We drill ourselves on our lines, memorize key points, practice the voice-over for the 37 slides we’ll show, test the demo to make sure it purrs like a kitten. We believe that if we only perform well enough and hit all of our high notes, the power of our words will impress and persuade.

Only it doesn’t work that way.

Now, reframe the sales call as a shared experience. You and the customer are both living in that moment together, and now it’s your job to engineer that experience… you’re no longer the funniest guy at the party, but rather the host who’s creating an awesome environment for his guests. What will you do differently?

You’ll attend. As in, the root verb in attention. Ironically, attending is also the same as being present. Get it?

You’ll know something about your guests. There are no strangers. You can always know enough to make the other person feel interesting.

You’ll draw people out and make connections. Use what you know to bring the other person into the experience. This is the opposite of bludgeoning them with your own story.

You’ll have a plan and watch the clock. Great hosts pay attention to time and pace. They know when things are starting to drag, when people start to disconnect.

You’ll rewrite the plan when you need to. If things are petering out and nobody’s connecting, change the plan. It’s your plan; you get to do that.

Sales is not performance art. It’s about creating a fertile space where trust, emotion and opportunity can grow. Too many of us become tone deaf from listening to the sound of our own performances. Let it go. Be interested. Engineer a great shared experience and watch how everything changes.

Including you.

Originally posted in 2014, but still well short of the expiration date.


Rethinking Email.


I’m thinking a lot about reinvention lately.

So much of what we are able to do for clients and agencies is new. Yet how we go about communicating and selling is not. As I work with managers and sales teams our conversations almost always turn to Email and the fact that it’s just not working for us anymore, externally or internally.

Generally speaking, we tend to send badly-structured Emails that are too long, too predictable, to too many people. We use email as a blunt-force instrument, overwhelming our prospects and coworkers with unendurable detail and word counts. What was once a promising chance at immediate connection has jumped the shark and become a burden to all involved. It’s time to stop the madness. Here’s how.

This week’s Drift is proudly underwritten by Bionic for Ad Sales, which automates ad sales lead generation with software that pitches your ad inventory to hundreds of media planning teams while they are making media buying decisions. To learn more, go to https://www.bionic-ads.com/seller/

Deserve their attention. If you haven’t done research on your customer and don’t have a specific way to help him, don’t reach out at all. Inboxes are flooded every day by people who want only to learn about your business or introduce you to my company. Not having a legitimate customer-focused agenda is a non-starter.

Write to the screen that’s being read. When you send email to a prospective customer, write to the email interface on the mobile device where they are no doubt screening and reading it. Write no more than what fits on a mobile screen.  Nobody wants to read a cold, 400-word recitation of your company’s value. Say less.

Have a communication strategy. While you’re whittling your message down to 80 or 90 words, know that it’s just one of the messages you’ll be sending. For a legitimate potential client for whom you can create real value, a couple of short messages followed by an intelligent voice mail followed by a LinkedIn message every couple of days is the perfect cadence – and the perfect blend of media, timing and approach. Stop trying to accomplish everything in one epic Email. Serialize your approach.

Lead with need. Assume you’re getting maybe a glance at your subject line and – if really lucky – a look at the first two lines of your message. Start writing thoughtful, concise, provocative subject lines about topics relevant to the customer, and stop wasting the critical first words with small talk and fake friendship.

Get to the point. Start your emails with I’m writing you because… Then immediately say something about your customer’s situation. This simple technique forces you to elevate the client agenda to the beginning of the communication.

Address to one, send to no more than two. Sending emails to several people or whole teams is just a bad idea. Whether you’re writing externally or internally, it becomes quickly apparent if you’re just covering your ass. Start limiting those distribution fields and speaking directly to your customers (and co-workers) and their agendas.

When it comes to understanding our customers and reaching out to them, there is an embarrassment of riches at our disposal. There’s no reason anyone should be bludgeoning customers with uninformed, cold email in 2019. This is a change you completely control. Make it today.


Web 25: News, Speech and Advertising


Late October will mark the 25th anniversary of advertising on the Web. Having been part of the team that ushered in those first primitive digital ads in 1994, I’ll be using this space in the intervening weeks to explore the fulfillment, failure and future of the web’s marketing and social promise. This week: News, Speech and Advertising.

It seems that we’ve been talking about the web’s role in the demise of the news business from day one.  As the familiar narrative goes, more consumer time, attention and news-viewing migrated away from printed newspapers and news magazines while simultaneously the three advertising pillars of print journalism – auto sales, classifieds and real estate – were reinvented by digital entrepreneurs. Through the lens of gauzy nostalgia, it’s easy to see this as a two-character tragedy.

It’s more accurate, however, to view it as a much more complex three-character drama. While the web was taking its first tentative steps as a commercial news and information medium in the fall of 1994, OJ Simpson’s white Bronco had just been brought to a stop, Fox News was just about to be invented, and the Telecommunications Act of 1996 was being busily drafted and lobbied. The mid-90s was when the full-time media spectacle, the idea of news as entertainment and the end of rules preventing consolidated media ownership all converged.

Kind of makes you stop thinking of the web as the wrecking ball of newspapers and more as the savior of actual news.

This week’s Drift is proudly underwritten by Permutive, the data management platform built for publishers. Permutive gives you visibility of your entire audience, allowing you to increase audience match rates, win more RFPs and grow your data-driven advertising revenue. Meet us at Seller Forum on October 23rd to learn more.

Two of the promises of digital technology and web publishing were the democratization of news gathering and the preservation of transparency. To a significant degree, these promises have been kept. But it’s complicated.

It’s legitimate to mourn the demise of so many print newspapers and the thinning of their staffs (and closing of bureaus) as they’ve moved to digital distribution. And we can also lament the devolution of cable news into a bottomless pit of rancorous talking heads stoking the partisan furnace. At the same time we can see a generation of young – and not-so-young journalists building their own identities and news credentials via blogs, Twitter, self-publishing and story updates no longer dependent on print deadlines. Somewhat ironically, those same correspondents are increasingly sought out to fill open hours on cable news programming, thereby amplifying the signal on what they write and report.

But is advertising revenue – what you and I do for a living – making a positive contribution to the present and future of news and speech? That’s even more complicated. While brands are often willing to sponsor big, high-profile publishing projects along with news organizations, day-to-day media buyers are blacklisting news related content. In the name of brand safety, we’re saying no to the climate change adjacency and yes to another cat video.

Advertisers aren’t necessarily responsible for the direct support of journalism and free speech. But blanket avoidance of content that’s so persistently important and present in the lives of the customer is a moral and strategic failure. Bringing brands and advertising budgets back into natural, healthy alignment with news and journalism is an unfinished job. Here’s hoping our greatest brands step up and step in.


Web 25: Did We Change Advertising?


Late October will mark the 25th anniversary of advertising on the Web. Having been part of the team that ushered in those first primitive digital ads in 1994, I’ll be using this space in the intervening weeks to explore the fulfillment, failure and future of the web’s marketing and social promise. This week: The impact of digital on the practice of advertising.

As Internet Advertising started to find its legs in 1995-96, there was a fair bit of handwringing among those who took it’s still-uncertain future seriously. Like the re purposed radio shows that comprised early 1950s television programming, advertising on the web was derivative of its predecessor forms. The first banners were tiny outdoor ads. As bandwidth expanded and boxes got bigger, on-page ads started to resemble magazine advertising. Streaming ushered in progressively longer, faster, higher-fidelity TV ads. But to re-purpose the inimitable Peggy Lee, Is that all there is?

Yes and no.

This week’s Drift is proudly underwritten by Permutive, the data management platform built for publishers. When Entrepreneur Media realized their existing data management platform was only targeting 20% of their audience, they switched to Permutive. Find out why they switched DMP before their existing contract ended in our upcoming webinar.

As it turns out, the sight/sound/motion of TV Ads…. pretty….pretty good!  Staying within the classic definition of advertising, video seems to make everybody happy. The consumer appetite for digital video – ad supported and otherwise – seems bottomless. It doesn’t replace the mythic reach of the Big 4 Network/TV age, but it’s as significant as most anything out there today. And advertisers have stepped up.  Aside from the occasional YouTube/brand safety kerfuffle, they seem to want to buy just about whatever is available.

So did we change advertising?  Yes, we took the historic TV model of video ads accompanying content and made it more targetable and accountable, and put it – literally – in the hand of the consumer via the mobile device. Have we yet fulfilled the potential that digital technology enables?

Not yet.

While the popularity and profit of the video advertising model will keep us all well-fed for many years, the ultimate change in advertising will be its full immersion in, and submission to, business and commerce. Digital technology and communication have rendered the old barriers between hearing, learning, considering, choosing and buying obsolete. And while we’ve made some brief nods toward blending ads and commerce, our goal has always been more accountable advertising… an improved status quo.

The real change will be when we don’t think of it as advertising at all, but rather as just an early stage in the commercial relationship. The tech is there. So far, the will is not. But real change is inevitable.


Web 25: Targeting and Personalization


Late October will mark the 25th anniversary of advertising on the Web. Having been part of the team that ushered in those first primitive digital ads in 1994, I’ll be using this space in the intervening weeks to explore the fulfillment, failure and future of the web’s marketing and social promise. This week, Targeting and Personalization.

As our small team of outlaws were selling the first ads on the web, it would be more than a year till the invention of the first ad server.

Think about that for a minute.

There was no practical way to serve an ad independent of the page it was selected to run on. User targeting was impossible. To us – then – it was enough that a marketer could talk to a customer based on whether she was viewing a page about home improvement or cooking. That you had an opportunity to advertise at just the exact moment when relevant attention was being spent was, at the time, revolutionary.  Of course, that moment couldn’t scale and wouldn’t hold. Change was inevitable… but what kind?

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The deal we struck with consumers (or at least told each other at conferences) was better and more personalized advertising and content experiences in exchange for data. We’ll be watching you, but we’ll make it worth your while.  By even the most charitable estimate, we haven’t lived up to that bargain. We went on a serious bender of infinite supply and cheap data…and the hangover is a bitch.  Seeing no value, consumers have revolted. Politicians of all stripes are engaged. GDPR has led to CCPA. And major marketers are demanding heretofore unseen levels of transparency and purity.

And as a result, just maybe we’re getting back to what made this all special in the first place.

No one is naïve enough to think we’ll go backwards to a world without ad servers. But look at what is happening. First party data is quickly becoming table stakes. Marketers are taking a fresh look at context: they are moving beyond brand safety and looking for brand building environments. There’s been a boom in content marketing and high-production-value video adjacencies. Publishers are rising to the challenge of delivering real personalization and reciprocal value to marketers and consumers.

We’re not going to start hard coding ads onto web pages again. But if we pay attention, we might realize that we’ve found the source code for a healthy web for marketers, publishers and consumers. A little bit of ’94 might still be good for us.