Doug Weaver

How the Idea Survives.

31
Shares
Share with your friends










Submit

Pushed out of the multiplex by Big Hollywood’s parade of CGI superhero vehicles and gross-out comedy sequels, Little Hollywood – the creators – responded with a creative programming renaissance in cable, OTT and streaming channels.

Pushed off the digital media plan by Big Platforms and the relentless growth and consolidation of Big Programmatic, Little Publishing – our creators – have responded with their own creative programming renaissance.  Custom events, podcasts, influencers, social optimization, content marketing – I’m sure the list of possibilities has grown just since I began this post.  Publishers new and old have become more creative than ever before in all aspects of their businesses.  Except one:  Sales.

Promotional Message:  Tired of the pessimism and helplessness born out of a consolidating digital ad market?  Ready for some actionable strategies and meaningful alternatives to help your team sell more and better?  Our final Seller Forum of 2017 is happening on Wednesday October 11th in New York, and if you lead a sales team and want more from and for them, request your invitation today.

In boardrooms and bullpens all around New York and Silicon Beach, execs at creative companies are scratching their heads, puzzled at why their amazing creative ideas are not fetching the attention and premiums they often deserve.  The answer is deceptively simple:  you are feeding those ideas directly into a transactional ad buying system that was built to manage cost against standardized ad units.   Dress that business up in the language of creativity and ideation – hire gurus, launch divisions – and it’s still the same buyer (with the same calculator) on the other side of the table.

As content and experience have become multidimensional, sales has doubled-down on transaction.  And the results have been predictably underwhelming.  The challenge for the next generation CRO – the “moonshot” of the next 2-3 years – is to reinvent digital and integrated media sales; to make the sales process as intricate and creative as the ideas it represents.  This is going to call for four big intellectual and behavioral shifts:

  1. Embrace enterprise selling. The standard call to “go see the client” is not enough. We need to break out of the advertising channel entirely and sell broader and deeper within the client organization.
  2. Find new budgets. Why do we always start with “the digital ad budget?”  What we do has as much in common with PR, sales promotion, shopper marketing, research, compliance…you get the picture.
  3. Learn to love Scatter. Planning cycles, campaigns and RFPs are looking more than a little tired.  They exist because media agencies need them to exist.  Those who will win are those who will set their own pace and not rely on inclusion in a process that’s getting less relevant by the week.
  4. Think like a producer. The old questions were “How am I going to win a spot in this campaign?” and “How can I sell them this product?”  The new question is “How can I get my project funded?”

Your ideas aren’t the problem.  They just need a new marketplace.

31
Shares
Share with your friends










Submit

Meet Your Competition.

71
Shares
Share with your friends










Submit

Working with scores of companies in the digital ecosystem, I end up being the go-to guy on a persistent question:  “How do we compare with the other guys?”

Individual sellers and whole sales organizations demonstrate a serious need to be benchmarked.  There are great companies out there who offer this as a service:  they’ll tell a given company whether they are number one, two or twenty-three in the eyes of agencies or marketers.  Or you can always fall back on whose is bigger (comparing revenues, page views, video streams….whatever.)

But nevertheless, they ask me the question, because I’ve spent close time with many of the companies they perceive to be competitors.  And they really, really want to know how they stack up.

Promotional Message:  Tired of the pessimism and helplessness born out of a consolidating digital ad market?  Ready for some actionable strategies and meaningful alternatives to help your team sell more and better?  Our final Seller Forum of 2017 is happening on Wednesday October 11th in New York, and if you lead a sales team and want more from and for them, request your invitation today.

The answer is simple, if also a bit frustrating:  If you’re measuring yourself against any competitor, you’re embracing ambivalence and courting failure.   Give power and currency to someone else and you immediately make it all about a company and a sales team and issues that you have no control over.

The right approach is to localize the questions:  Given our resources, skills, voice, capabilities, scale, etc., what is the best we can possibly be?  How might we become indispensable to this customer at this critical time in their business?

Tell your team (or tell yourself) to stop comparing your insides to other companies’ outsides.  The more you obsess about your ‘competitors’ the more you stop paying attention to the customers whose money you hope to earn.  Your competition is you….your benchmark is your potential value to the marketer.  All the rest is noise.

When a member of her staff would ask Oprah Winfrey about the latest guest that Jerry Springer or Arsenio Hall or Sally Jesse Raphael had booked, she always offered the same admonition:  “Let them do them.  We’ll do us.”

Priceless.

71
Shares
Share with your friends










Submit

Summer is for Managers. (Part III)

48
Shares
Share with your friends










Submit

In this third of our summertime management posts, we take a second look at leadership and how it defines the organizations we all struggle to manage.

I’ve been thinking a lot about leadership within and across the dozens of companies I’ve worked with over the past several years.  A single disruptive idea keeps coming back to me:

Leadership isn’t a set of actions by the leader.  It’s a state of being for the organization.

In this age of strong-man leaders and celebrity CEOs, we tend to individualize leadership and celebrate the speeches and the big “leadership moves” of the individual leader.  But from all I can tell, those victories are pyrrhic and their effects ephemeral.  The truly great leaders know that leadership isn’t about what you do or fix; it’s about what you tend and sustain.  It’s not the next hill to be taken, but the ecosystem to be developed and supported.

Promotional Message: As a CRO, you’d love all your managers to have two more years of experience and perspective, but you can’t afford to wait that long.  In one to two days, Upstream Group can offer the equivalent of an executive MBA in digital sales management custom built to their needs.  Executive Sales Strategist Scot McLernon has led two different sales organizations that were both recognized as the industry’s best by the IAB, and he’s ready to help your managers better compete for the people and business your company deserves. Ask us about “Accelerated Transformation for Sales Managers” today. 

In my opinion, great organizational leaders (whether they are leading an entire company or a sales organization) should be focused on the questions behind three overlapping and interdependent ecosystems:  Talent, Incubation and Culture.

How might we attract, filter and secure the talent we need and deserve?

How might we better incubate and assimilate that talent into our organization during the critical first two years after hiring?

How might we foster and maintain an attractive, supportive culture based on employee engagement?

Great leaders keep asking their managers these questions and weigh each big decision or program against the scrutiny these questions create.  And they force their managers and teams to examine the overlap and co-dependence of these concerns.  Without an attractive culture, how can a company attract great talent?  Without a focus on incubating new talent, what is the point of securing those hires in the first place?  Unless we engage our employees, new and experienced, in caring for and teaching each other, how would we ever hope to create an attractive culture?

Great leadership isn’t about you.  It’s about your organizational focus and values. But you need to start that conversation.

48
Shares
Share with your friends










Submit

Summer is for Managers (Part II)

36
Shares
Share with your friends










Submit

Enjoy the second in our series of manager focused posts. Because nothing says summer like management theory!

Everybody wants to talk about great leaders these days. But this management stuff is pretty hard work!  Many business-people don’t seriously distinguish between leadership and management, but they should. As Marcus Buckingham says in The One Thing You Need to Know, “Leaders play checkers; managers play chess.” In checkers, every piece moves exactly the same; there’s one leadership message that applies to everyone in the company. In chess, every piece has its own quirky individual moves; management is about how you move and plan for the individual.

Over the past weeks I’ve conducted sales workshops for a dozen digital sales organizations, working closely with leaders and managers to “make it all stick” for their teams. It always comes down to what the managers do; what they commit to and how they hold their sellers accountable. So  let’s look at what managers do.

Promotional Message: As a CRO, you’d love all your managers to have two more years of experience and perspective, but you can’t afford to wait that long.  In one to two days, Upstream Group can offer the equivalent of an executive MBA in digital sales management custom built to their needs.  Executive Sales Strategist Scot McLernon has led two different sales organizations that were both recognized as the industry’s best by the IAB, and he’s ready to help your managers better compete for the people and business your company deserves. Ask us about “Accelerated Transformation for Sales Managers” today. 

Managers Break It All Down: When leaders and companies inspire with soaring missions and motivational gems it can actually have an adverse effect on some sellers. “I see where the company is going, but I just don’t see how I can get there.” The good manager sees the delta between grand vision and troubled reality and helps the seller navigate it, piece by piece. Which accounts have the best odds? Where will you spend your time? Who are the right people? The good manager understands that talented sellers often need help building a plan.

Managers Keep Track of Actions: In The Heart of the Game, Thomas Boswell points out that great baseball managers never obsess about the final score, which is after all just an outcome. Instead, they obsess about the interim actions and decisions that would have subtly changed the course of the game:  the base-running error in the second inning; the missed cutoff man in the sixth; swinging at the first pitch against a tiring starter. They focus on how the game was played, which is ultimately controllable. It’s the same with sales managers. Watch, discuss, correct and reward the behaviors that will lead to sales. If you don’t, you might be cluelessly celebrating hollow victories, lucky breaks.

Managers Remember:  It’s not sexy, but truly great managers are the institutional memories of their organizations. They remember what they’ve asked their team members to do and when; they remember the narrative of key deals; they remember the behavioral promises of those they manage. It’s one of the reasons great managers commit to CRM systems and consistent reporting; and it’s the reason why so many instinctive, “lone wolf” sales superstars end up making lousy managers. If you’re a great manager, your organization and process management are what frees your sellers to play a much bigger game for their customers, and for your company.

Once you’ve looked this over, share it with the people on your team. It might be the key to unlocking a productive new relationship with those you manage.

36
Shares
Share with your friends










Submit

Summer is for Managers (Part I)

63
Shares
Share with your friends










Submit

While you might take a vacation, you never really take a complete break from being a manager. Over the next handful of weeks, we’ll be offering up several of our most popular posts on the art and science of being a great manager. Enjoy, and let us know what you think.

Thousands of books have been written on managing employee performance, each volume offering theories and tactics more complicated than the one that preceded it.  But like most things in life, simpler is better.

Recently I was discussing a thorny employee issue with a client, and as we mapped things out a simple ‘test’ presented itself. The three factors to be explored – in order – are clarity, capacity and will.

Promotional Message: As a CRO, you’d love all your managers to have two more years of experience and perspective, but you can’t afford to wait that long.  In one to two days, Upstream Group can offer the equivalent of an executive MBA in digital sales management custom built to their needs.  Executive Sales Strategist Scot McLernon has led two different sales organizations that were both recognized as the industry’s best by the IAB, and he’s ready to help your managers better compete for the people and business your company deserves. Ask us about “Accelerated Transformation for Sales Managers” today.

When you’re questioning a performance problem, you shouldn’t simply call the employee in for a free form conversation or give him a list of complaints.  Both approaches will lead to a bunch of random reactions and you’ll get lost in the details very quickly. Instead, take things in order.

Clarity. Is the employee really – really – clear about what is expected? This is on you.  Have you communicated effectively about the full expectations of the job or task?  Have you put it in writing? You may have a clear picture of what needs to be done in your head, and right now it’s probably fighting for space with all those frustrations you’ve developed. But you must take the time to carefully externalize the picture with your employee.  Once that’s done, you can move on to question number two…

Capacity. Is the employee capable of doing what is expected? You must ask hard questions about whether the employee’s experience, skills and training fully enable to do what is needed. Many of us never ask this because it calls into question our own hiring practices. If you suspect a lack of training or adequate supervision is the issue, you may choose to apply time and resources. But don’t forget to ask the hard question: can this employee do this job? When you’ve checked the boxes on clarity and capacity, you move on to the third and final issue… 

Will. Is the employee willing to do what is required? This is the hardest but most important part of the test…and often we don’t even consider it.  Sometimes people don’t do things simply because they don’t want to. They will likely call out a lot of other issues and rationalizations. But if you look closely, a lack of will is not that hard to spot.  And it’s the issue that probably matters more than any other. This one is fully on the employee and you must act decisively when you see it. Say goodbye.

Don’t just keep this test to yourself. Share it with other managers. Better yet, share it with the employee. Walk through the three questions and make the test the framework for your next performance discussion. It just might be the simple means of solving your toughest issues.

63
Shares
Share with your friends










Submit